Table of contents


  1. HEALTH: New TB vaccine on the horizon
  2. ZIMBABWE: Nurses step up to initiate HIV treatment
  3. HEALTH: Uneven progress in global TB fight
  4. HIV/AIDS: Breaking science “silos” to find a vaccine
  5. EAST AFRICA: Sex workers need help too


HEALTH: New TB vaccine on the horizon
LONDON، 16/10/2012 (IRIN) - A research team at Oxford University in the UK is very close to determining the efficacy of their new tuberculosis (TB) vaccine. If current clinical trials are successful, it will be the first new TB vaccine in almost a century. full report
ZIMBABWE: Nurses step up to initiate HIV treatment
HARARE، 16/10/2012 (IRIN) - Faced with the ambitious target of reaching 85 percent of people in need of HIV treatment by the end of 2012, the Zimbabwean government has announced that nurses will be trained to prescribe and manage antiretroviral (ARV) drug treatment. full report
HEALTH: Uneven progress in global TB fight
NAIROBI، 17/10/2012 (IRIN) - The UN Millennium Development Goal (MDG) target of halting and reversing the tuberculosis (TB) epidemic by 2015 has been achieved, and the world is on track to meet the target of reducing global TB prevalence by 50 percent by 2015. But the progress has been irregular, with Africa and Europe lagging behind the rest of the world, according to the new Global Tuberculosis report by the UN World Health Organization (WHO). full report
HIV/AIDS: Breaking science “silos” to find a vaccine
BOSTON، 19/10/2012 (IRIN) - A chemical engineer, a polymer physicist and a chemist gather for coffee - and not much happens. “We could have all the greatest ideas in the world to discuss over coffee, but without funding, it is not possible do to more than napkin sketches,” said Darrell Irvine, a material scientist at the US-based Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) who, along with dozens of scientists, have received funding to break down silos of scientific disciplines to create an AIDS vaccine. full report
EAST AFRICA: Sex workers need help too
NAIROBI، 19/10/2012 (IRIN) - In humanitarian emergencies impoverished women may turn to sex work as a way of feeding themselves and their families; without the usual health services and given the often low education of those involved, sex is frequently unprotected, exposing them and their clients to sexually transmitted infections (STIs), including HIV. full report
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